08.22.16

Fiona Downgraded to Depression

Posted in Storm Track, Storm Facts, Tracking the Tropics, Model Forecasts at 10:51 am by gmachos

Storm Finally Giving Way to Hostile Environmental Conditions

Although its demise has been delayed, Fiona has been downgraded to a depression. The small storm, which has shown a great deal of resiliency during its lifetime, finally gave way to the persistent westerly shear. Fiona was downgraded to a tropical depression on Sunday, and as of early this morning, has been hanging on to depression status.

Presently, Tropical Depression Fiona is located some 525 miles to the Northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands, or approximately 670 miles to the Southeast of the resort island of Bermuda. The depression is moving to the West-Northwest at 18 miles per hour, and has maximum sustained winds of 35 miles per hour. Minimum central pressure is up to 1008 millibars or 29.77 inches of Hg.

Fiona’s circulation has been moving at a brisk pace, which has to be hindering development somewhat. The depression is expected to continue a West-Northwestward motion with a decrease in forward speed starting later today. The wind shear is expected to continue for the next 12 to 18 hours according to the 5:00 AM discussion from the National Hurricane Center.

However, the latest discussion from the NHC, as of 11:00 AM this morning indicates that between 48 and 72 hours, Fiona will encounter somewhat favorable conditions as it moves underneath an upper level trough into an area with easterly winds. However, beyond 72 hours, models indicate that the depression will encounter a second trough, and another round of strong southwesterly shear.

As a result, the latest intensity forecast from the NHC is calling for Fiona to gradually weaken into a remnant low within 36 hours, and weakening further to a trough within four days. Meanwhile, the forecast track is calling for Fiona’s eventual remnants to recurve to the west of Bermuda by the end of five days.

GWC Weather Journal–August 21, 2016

Posted in Uncategorized, GWC News at 8:12 am by gmachos

Tracking Severe Weather Threat for New Jersey on Sunday

Greg’s Weather Center has put together a journal of weather conditions during the course of the day on August 21st to track severe weather developments as a cold front pushes into New Jersey from the west.

August 21, 2016

7:00 AM–Took a look at the GWC WX Station just before going out for a walk on Sunday morning. Temperature is at 73 degrees and the dew point is at 70.

9:42 AM–Returned from playing some basketball up at Mobus Field by Watchung Lake. Temperature is now up to 81 degrees. Humidity is very high at 75 percent for a dew point of 73 degrees. Heat index now up to 87. Barometer steady at 29.83 inches of Hg. Had some rain earlier this morning. Only about 0.01 inches. Add that to the 0.05 inches from a sun shower on Saturday afternoon, and the rainfall total for the month at GWC is now up to 1.30 inches, and for the year it is 22.60 inches.

1:40 AM–Been outside periodically to check up on the time lapse video that I’m putting together for today’s weather. Have some nice cumulus clouds developing. There is a little bit of a breeze. Still warm and humid. Temperature is now up to 87 degrees with the humidity at 61 percent. Dew point is at 72 degrees for a heat index of 93. Barometer falling sharply at 29.77 inches of Hg.

3:10 PM–Skies getting overcast and dark outside GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Checked the radar, and the showers and storms that were in Eastern Pennsylvania are now moving into Western New Jersey. The outer bands of those showers and storms are in Somerset County right now. Temperature is down to 86 degrees. Humidity is up to 65 percent. Dew point is at 73 for a heat index of 92. Barometer continues to fall sharply at 29.74 inches of Hg. Winds are picking up.

3:37 PM–Took another step outside to check conditions. Felt a little raindrop on my hand. Temperature is down to 84 degrees. Humidity steady at 65 percent. Dew point is down a little to 72 degrees for a heat index of 90. Barometer still at 29.74 inches of Hg, but falling. Winds are light.

6:43 PM–Rain has been falling since around 5:00 PM. Light to moderate rainfall though. So far, there has been 0.15 inches of rain at GWC in South Plainfield. Temperature is down to 76 degrees. Humidity is up to 94 percent for a dew point of 74. Heat index is 79. Barometer is steady at 29.74 inches of Hg.

10:31 PM–Rain has stopped. Total rainfall for the day is 0.17 inches at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Temperature is 75 degrees. Humidity is still up at 96 percent for a dew point of 74 and a heat index of 79. Barometer is rising at 29.77 inches of Hg.

August 22, 2016

6:00 AM–Woke up about an hour ago. About to go out for a morning walk. Cold front has passed through. Checked the GWC WX Station. Temperature is down to 66 degrees. Probably the lowest morning temperature we’ve had in several weeks. Dew point is also down to 63 degrees.

8:09 AM–Came back from doing a morning run and a couple of errands. Temperature is up to 68 degrees with the dew point at 63. It is also a little breezy outside. Barometer is rising rapidly at 29.93 inches of Hg. Total rainfall from Sunday was 0.17 inches. Total for the month is now 1.46. Total rain for the year is now 22.76 inches.

08.21.16

Tropical Threats Looming on the Horizon in Atlantic

Posted in Storm Track, Storm Facts, Storm Preparation, Tracking the Tropics, Model Forecasts at 12:13 pm by gmachos

Fiona May Be Fading, but Two Other Disturbances Still Remain

As mentioned yesterday, the Tropical Atlantic is heating up as it should for this time of year. August is usually a ramp up month in terms of tropical activity as more storms and hurricanes develop during the course of the month as ocean temperatures reach optimum levels, especially in the Eastern Atlantic.

Earlier in the month, we had Hurricane Earl develop in the Caribbean, and eventually come ashore in Belize and Mexico. Then, earlier this week, Fiona developed, and is still hanging in although the storm has been fighting hostile environmental conditions, and isn’t expected to survive though the middle of this coming week.

There are still some threats in the Atlantic. The Cape Verde Season is kicking into overdrive with the emergence of Invest 99L in the East to Central Atlantic, and another tropical wave that just departed the West African coast within the last 24 hours. Both disturbances have been given good odds of developing into tropical cyclones within the next five days.

The more immediate threat of these two disturbances is Invest 99L, which is currently located about 1150 miles to the east of the Lesser Antilles. As of now, the disturbance still remains disorganized, and it is also moving at a fairly fast clip between 15 and 20 miles per hour, which sometimes hinders development. Environmental conditions are also less than ideal right now.

Factors such as upper level winds, humidity, and sea surface temperatures where Invest 99L is headed are currently forecast to be marginal for development over the next several days. As a result, the chances of formation within the next 48 hours is only 20 percent. However, as we get further into the weak, and Invest 99L moves into real estate where environmental conditions are more friendly for formation, the probability of formation increases to about 50 percent.

Moving further to the east, near the Cape Verde Islands and just off the coast of Africa, is another disturbance or tropical wave that has already shown tremendous potential despite just moving into the Atlantic within the last day. The disturbance, Invest 90L, is a tropical wave that already has low pressure associated with it, and conditions appear to be quite favorable for development.

The National Hurricane Center indicates that Invest 90L in the Eastern Atlantic is likely to become a depression over the next several days. The probability of formation over the next 48 hours is at 70 percent and the chances of formation within five days is up to 90 percent. Models have been going a bit crazy with some interesting long range scenarios over the past couple days.

The GFS model with 6 hour average precipitation, mean sea level pressure, and 1000 to 500 millibar thickness indicated in its 18Z run on Friday (August 19th) that a Category Five Hurricane would be bearing down on the Central Florida Gulf Coast by Monday, August 29th. Then, in another run of the full-res GFS at 12Z on August 20th, a Category Four Hurricane is bearing down on Eastern Long Island and Southern New England by September 3rd.

I must caution everyone about these models. While they are eye-popping and interesting, they are going out some 10 days to two weeks, and a lot can change in the atmosphere over that period. Heck, the atmosphere can change a lot in just a day. Nevertheless, it is that time of year where tropical storms and hurricanes develop with greater frequency in the Atlantic, and the United States coastline has been long overdue for a major hurricane (Wilma in 2005 was the last major hurricane to make landfall in the USA). Moral of the story is to be prepared.

Fishy Fiona Gets Fickle After Showing Some Fight

Posted in Storm Track, Storm Facts, Tracking the Tropics, Model Forecasts at 11:22 am by gmachos

Storm Reaches New Peak On Saturday Despite Predicted Demise

On Saturday, I had discussed the likely demise of Fiona, which had been expected at the time of that posting to become a depression late in the day, and dissipate by Monday. One thing you always have to keep in mind with tropical storms and hurricanes is that they can be fickle not only in terms of future track, but also sometimes with intensity.

Fiona demonstrated that fickle tendency on Saturday. After weakening to a minimal storm with 40 mph winds on Friday night, Fiona showed some resilience and fight on Saturday by strengthening to have winds of 50 mph before weakening again to 45 mph early Sunday morning. While this appeared to be a fluctuation, which can be anticipated, the storm defied forecast logic of its demise.

The storm has weakened a bit more over the past six hours. As of late latest advisory (11:00 AM EDT), which just came out a few minutes ago from the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, Fiona was back down to a minimal storm with 40 mile per hour winds and 50 mph gusts. Minimum central pressure still high at 1007 millibars or 29.74 inches of Hg.

Tropical storm force winds in Fiona extend some 45 miles from the center of circulation. Fiona is currently moving to the West-Northwest at 16 mph, and is located approximately 680 miles to the Northeast of the Leeward Islands. Right now, the storm is no threat to land, and could actually be downgraded to a tropical depression later today or this evening, but remember, the same was said this time yesterday, and Fiona experience a bit of a resurgence.

The latest forecast track from the National Hurricane Center has Fiona staying a bit more south and west than it had yesterday. On Saturday, the track appeared to have Fiona near Bermuda within five days. Now, the storm track has it still south of Bermuda by Wednesday, and actually turning northward and west of the resort island on Thursday morning. By that time, Fiona is anticipated to be post-tropical.

Thunderstorms Possible This Afternoon and Evening in New Jersey

Posted in GWC News, GWC Severe Weather Report at 11:00 am by gmachos

Some Storms Could Be Severe As Front Approaches From West

Over the last couple weeks here in New Jersey, there has been a tremendous amount of humidity. Last weekend, dew points were in the upper 70s to low 80s. For example, the dew point on Saturday at GWC was 82, and it was 81 last Sunday. Although storms earlier this week quelled some of the humidity, the dew points have remained quite high.

After some pleasant weather on Wednesday, the dew points went back up into the low to mid 70s from Thursday to Sunday morning. Fortunately, temperatures weren’t as warm as they were during the recent heatwave so conditions have been a bit more comfortable. A refreshing change is on the way though, but it will come as the result of some afternoon and evening thunderstorms on Sunday.

A cold front has been pushing eastward through the country. On Saturday, the frontal system was responsible for producing severe weather in Michigan and Ohio as well as other locations in the Midwest. There were 11 different severe weather reports from the weather on Saturday in Michigan and Ohio, which is the most since July 7th according to The Weather Channel.

Now, the front is pushing into the Northeast. Showers and storms are already firing up in Western Pennsylvania and New York, and that weather will be inching closer and closer to the Garden State, New York City, and Philadelphia as the day progresses on Sunday. Storms are forecast to affect GWC and Central Jersey sometime during the late afternoon and early evening.

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma has put sections of Eastern Pennsylvania and Western New Jersey under a marginal risk for severe storms. The National Weather Service Office in Mount Holly, New Jersey issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook for the entire Garden State on Sunday. Conditions possible with these storms include strong wind gusts, hail, heavy rainfall, and dangerous cloud to ground lightning.

So far this month, GWC has received far less rain than it did in July. As of this morning, there has only been 1.30 inches of rain here in South Plainfield. Last month, there was over six inches of rain. June saw several inches of rainfall. There have been a number of severe weather incidents at GWC within the past month. Most notable were the incidents on July 18th and July 25th. Both events were spurred on by tremendous heat and humidity.

There were some strong storms overnight on Tuesday into Wednesday at GWC. Heavy thunder with vivid lightning accompanied these storms, which also had some gusty winds that brought down large tree limbs not only in the neighborhood outside GWC, but also in nearby Piscataway. Yesterday, the heat and humidity produced storms that dumped torrential rain in Long Island during the early afternoon. Behind the front will be some welcome changes though.

After some lingering showers on Monday morning, the temperature and dew point levels will drop. The Mercury will have a tough time getting into the 80s over the next two or three days early next week, and lows will dip into the 50s. Dew points will be much more comfortable. So, there will be some short term pain with the storms this afternoon, but that will yield a much deserved reward to start the final two weeks of August.

08.20.16

Fishy Fiona Starting to Fade?

Posted in Storm Track, Storm Facts, Tracking the Tropics at 10:07 am by gmachos

Latest Forecast Calls for Storm to Weaken to Depression Later Saturday

Over the past several days, the Atlantic Tropics have begun to show signs of picking up again after being dormant for much of the past two months. After starting the season with four named storms by June 30th, the Atlantic has only had one storm, Hurricane Earl over the past seven weeks or so.

However, Fiona emerged earlier this week, and while the storm has been rather meek, its formation is a sign that the peak of the Atlantic Hurricane Season is upon us. Forming well out in the Eastern Atlantic, Fiona first emerged as a depression later Tuesday night, and became the sixth named storm of 2016 on Wednesday afternoon.

Fortunately for residents of the Lesser Antilles as well as Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and Cuba, Fiona is steering clear of the islands, and appears to be a storm for the fishes. The latest forecast track has Fiona turning more to the northwest and in the area of Bermuda at the end of the five day period.

In addition, Fiona has been a minimal storm with only 40 to 45 mph winds, and hasn’t been doing much strengthening. Environmental conditions have not been favorable for Fiona to develop much further over the past several days. Currently, Fiona has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph winds with gusts up to 50 mph and a minimum central pressure of 1008 millibars or 29.77 inches of Hg.

Fiona’s circulation has been ragged and less healthy over the past 6 to 12 hours or so. The storm has been battling hostile conditions from the environment around it including strong wind shear, upper level convergence, and dry air according to the most recent forecast discussion from the National Hurricane Center at 5:00 AM EDT on Saturday morning.

As a result, the National Hurricane Center believes that Fiona will weaken to a depression later in the day on Saturday and perhaps become a remnant low within 48 hours. Fiona should completely dissipate within five days. However, more storms could be on the horizontal with Invest 99L in the Eastern Atlantic, and another wave expected to move off the Afircan coast later on Saturday.

Activity Picks Up Significantly in Eastern Pacific

Posted in Storm Facts, Eastern Pacific, Tracking the Tropics at 9:31 am by gmachos

EPAC Makes Up for Slow Start With 10 Storms in Last Seven Weeks

While the Atlantic got off to a fast start with four named storms including a hurricane by the end of June, the Eastern Pacific was unusually quiet. Despite starting its season on May 15th, the EPAC only had one depression over the first month and a half of the season, and didn’t have its first named storm until July 2nd.

However, over the past seven weeks, the Eastern Pacific basin has made up for lost time with 10 named storms including five hurricanes. Of those five hurricanes, three of them became major hurricanes: Blas, Darby, and Georgette. So far this season, the Eastern Pacific has had 11 depressions, 10 named storms, 5 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes.

The latest storm to develop is Tropical Storm Kay, which has strengthened a little in the past 24 hours to have winds of 50 miles per hour. Kay is located about 140 miles to the West-Northwest of Socorro Island, or 310 miles to the Southwest of the Southern tip of Baja California.

Kay is not expected to strengthen over the next couple days. Last year, the Eastern Pacific was very active with 22 depressions, 18 named storms, 13 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. The strongest storm of the season was Hurricane Patricia, which grew to be the most intense storm ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere with maximum winds of 200 miles per hour and a minimum central pressure of 879 millibars, or 25.96 inches of Hg.

Part of the reason for the sluggish start to 2016 in the Eastern Pacific was the dissipation of the latest El Niño episode earlier this year. When there is an El Niño, the Eastern Pacific waters are warmer than normal, and with tropical storms and hurricanes needing at least 80 degree sea surface temperatures to grow and flourish, the decay of the latest El Niño hindered development of storms.

A weak La Niña is anticipated as we move into the latter portion of 2016, and that means cooler than normal waters are expected in the Eastern Pacific, which is not conducive for tropical development. Meanwhile, conditions in the Atlantic are expected to pick up with less activity in the Eastern Pacific to produce upper level wind shear.

08.19.16

Heat and Humidity Dominant Theme in Summer of 2016

Posted in GWC News, GWC Severe Weather Report at 5:54 pm by gmachos

Twenty-One Days of 90 Degree Plus Temperatures at GWC

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, there was an emergence of an El Niño pattern and for the past several years, temperatures had been more comfortable. The summers of 2011 and 2012 saw peak temperatures over 100 degrees, but then in 2013, 2014, and 2015, the peaks were only in the mid 90s.

While the heat has not been as intense as the summers of 2011 and 2012, there has certainly been a lot of it at GWC. The peak temperature of the year at GWC was reached recently during the latest heat wave to grip the Garden State and Mid-Atlantic States.

On Saturday, August 13th, the high temperature at GWC in South Plainfield was 96 degrees, the highest to date in 2016 for this location. On top of that, the humidity reached its highest level of 2016 with a peak dew point of 82. Combining the heat and humidity, the heat index reached a remarkable 125 degrees.

The intense tropical heat and humidity last weekend were the highlights of the latest heatwave at GWC and the rest of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. This latest torrid stretch of weather lasted for six days. It was the fourth heatwave of the summer at GWC. The longest stretch of 90 degree plus heat was eight days cumulating with powerful storms on July 25th.

There have been 21 days of 90 degree plus weather at GWC in South Plainfield since the week before Memorial Day Weekend. The summer season got off to an auspicious start with a four day heat wave that greeted the unofficial start to summer. With the intense heat and humidity, something has had to give at times, and that means severe weather.

Like those summers of 2011 and 2012, there was plenty of strong to severe storms throughout New Jersey and the Mid-Atlantic this summer. Most notably for GWC was on July 18th and July 25th. Most recently, there were some strong storms during the overnight hours earlier this week. Storms on Wednesday morning brought down large tree limbs in Piscataway and South Plainfield.

While July was a very wet month with over six inches of rain at GWC in South Plainfield, August has been relatively dry. Much of the rain has come within the past week with 0.53 inches of rain coming from strong storms early on Wednesday morning. So far this August, there has only been 1.24 inches of rain at GWC in South Plainfield. For the year, there has been a total of 22.54 inches.

Atlantic Tropics Beginning to Heat Up

Posted in Storm Track, Storm Facts, Storm Preparation, Storm Safety, Tracking the Tropics at 3:57 pm by gmachos

Fiona Followed By Invest 99L and Disturbance About to Come Off Africa

Back in June, the Atlantic was off to a fast start. On top of having a hurricane in January, and a storm develop in May, there were two more in June for four named storms in the Atlantic. Meanwhile, the Eastern Pacific was off to one of its slowest starts in decades.

Fast forward to today, and you’ll find that things have flip-flopped with the Eastern Pacific picking up in activity over the last two months while the Atlantic has gone dormant. Other than Earl forming and becoming a hurricane over the first week of August, the Atlantic has been quiet.

On the other hand, the Eastern Pacific, which only had a tropical depression over the first month and a half of its season, and didn’t have its first named storm until July 2nd, is now up to its 11th named storm in Tropical Storm Kay, which became a storm early Friday morning. Five of the storms have gone on to become hurricanes.

Over the past several days though, the Tropical Atlantic has begun to wake up again. On Tuesday, the sixth depression of the season emerged late in the evening, and within 18 hours, the depression became Tropical Storm Fiona. The storm is still a minimal tropical storm with 45 mph winds, and hasn’t really strengthened much over the past couple days.

Fiona has been on a track far to the north putting it out of reach of the Lesser Antilles and the Caribbean. The storm appears to be one for the fishes although the latest forecast guidance from the National Hurricane Center indicates that Fiona could threaten Bermuda within five days. Behind Fiona is another disturbance that could become more of a threat with time.

Located about six hundred miles to the southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, and a few hundred miles to the southeast of Fiona, Invest 99L has been tracked since it departed the African coast a couple days ago. The disturbance is currently disorganized, and it is entering an area of dry and stable air, which isn’t good for development.

However, Invest 99L does have a medium chance, or about 50 percent chance of development within the next five days. Activity is also picking up across Africa. Another disturbance is expected to move off the West African coast during the day on Saturday. In addition, there are another clusters of showers and storms moving across to Sub-Saharan and Sahel regions.

We are now moving into the peak of the Atlantic Season. Statistically speaking, the peak of the Atlantic Hurricane Season is September 10th. This is also the time that we see the classic Cape Verde storms develop, or disturbances coming off the African coast to gradually develop into textbook tropical cyclones or hurricanes. Recently, NOAA issued an update to its seasonal forecast, and continued to call for this season to be the most active since 2012.

So, now is the time to start getting prepared for the possibility of a landfalling tropical storm or hurricane in your area. The last major hurricane to make landfall in the United States was Hurricane Wilma back in 2005. The coastline from Maine to Texas has experienced an incredible period of luck when it comes to powerful hurricanes not coming ashore. With that comes complacency and lack of preparedness.

Time is now to get ready. Make sure that you have plenty of non-perishable food and snacks stored away. Make arrangements to have cash available. Have plenty of batteries, flashlights, and water. Most importantly, have a plan put together so that there is something for you and others to follow if a storm does come your way.

08.17.16

GWC Weather Journal–August 11-16, 2016

Posted in GWC News at 6:46 pm by gmachos

Here is a weather journal that I kept during the three days of heat and humidity at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ.

August 11, 2016

11:59 AM–Just took a look outside. Skies are partly cloudy and it feels very muggy. Temperature is up to 88 degrees with a dew point of 79 for a heat index of 102.

3:26 PM–Very oppressive conditions outside. Temperature is at 91 after reaching a high of 92 degrees. Dew point is downright tropical at 80 degrees. Heat index up to 112. Just was outside and saw quite a bit of cumulus clouds while in Spring Lake Park.

3:29 PM–National Weather Service has issued a Excessive Heat Watch for much of New Jersey starting Saturday afternoon and lasting until Sunday evening. Heat index values could peak around 110 degrees on Saturday and 107 on Sunday.

7:35 PM–High temperature at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ on Thursday was 93 degrees. Dew point peaked at 81 degrees while the heat index was oppressive at 115.

10:57 PM–Radar showing large cluster of showers and storms moving about to move into Northern New Jersey.

11:59 PM–Checked outside. Light rain starting to fall. Lightning in the distance. Radar now showing storms about to hit GWC.



August 12, 2016

7:51 AM–Woke up a little while ago. Windows to the front porch door are all fogged up because of the tropical air we have in place, and the cold air inside in the living room. Temperature is 74 degrees with a dew point of 74. Humidity is at 98 percent. Heat index is up to 78. Outside there are already cirrocumulus clouds forming. The air already feels very muggy.

9:38 AM–Just returned from doing my morning walk. Very humid outside. Worked up a really good sweat out there. Cirrocumulus clouds continue to develop. Lots of dew in the backyard. Sun not strong yet. Temperature is 80 degrees with humidity of 95 percent for a dew point of 78. Heat index up to 89. Barometer steady at 29.90 inches of Hg. Total rain from storms early this morning was only 0.03 inches.

12:28 PM–Checked the latest conditions at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Temperature is now up to 89 degrees. Dew point is downright tropical at 80 degrees. Heat index is up to 106. Barometer is falling at 29.88 inches of Hg. Looking at the sky conditions, there are some puffy cumulus clouds overhead. Feels like a furnace outside.

1:38 PM–Looked at the latest weather conditions at the GWC WX Station. Temperature is up to 91 degrees with humidity at 71 percent for a dew point of 81. Heat index is now up to 111 degrees. Barometer still falling at 29.84 inches.

3:06 PM–Just checked the time lapse video being recorded on the old iPhone 5s that I have in the yard. Still very hot and humid. Plenty of cumulus clouds around. Temperature is now up to 93 degrees. Humidity is at 65 percent for a dew point of 79 degrees. Heat index is 112 degrees. Barometer continues to fall at 29.83 inches of Hg.

5:08 PM–Just checked conditions at the GWC WX Station. Temperature is at the high for the day at 93 degrees. Dew point peaked at 81 degrees. Heat index topped out at 118. Currently, the dew point is down to 78 while the heat index has dropped off to 111.

6:15 PM–Thunderstorm moving through with lots of lightning and some gusty winds. Not a lot of rain though. Only 0.02 inches.

7:53 PM–Temperature dropped to 78 degrees. Humidity is at 88 percent. Dew point is still high at 75. Heat index is down to 83 degrees. Barometer is steady at 29.84 inches of Hg.



August 13, 2016

6:52 AM–Getting ready to head out to Trenton Catholic Academy for some games from the 2016 Summer Primetime Shootout. Relatively speaking, conditions are comfortable, but there is a lot of moisture in the air. Lots of dew on the ground. Windows on the porch door are fogged up.

11:15 AM–Leaving Trenton Catholic, and you can feel the heat and humidity once you got out of the gym. I was quite surprised how comfortable conditions were in the gym. There were a couple fans running in the gym, but I don’t believe that there was any air conditioning. Window shades were down to prevent the sunlight from getting in.

2:00 PM–Temperature in Woodbridge, NJ up to 93 degrees with a heat index of 105. Had a workout in South Amboy’s Waterfront Park, and the humidity finally got to me, but I was able to get a good walk and run in.

5:05 PM–Checked the conditions here at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Temperature reached the highest it has been all year at 96 degrees. Dew point reached a record way 82 degrees, and the heat index was 125, another record.

7:47 PM–Checked the conditions at the GWC WX Station. The sun might be going down, but conditions are still oppressive outside. Temperature is down to 90 degrees with a dew point of 79 for a heat index of 107. Barometer is steady at 29.82 inches of Hg.



August 14, 2016

7:15 AM–Getting ready to go outside for a morning walk. Temperature is up to 75 degrees. Dew point is at 74 percent. Heat index is at 78.

9:45 AM–Just came in from my walk outside. I figured to get it in before the real intense heat and humidity of the day kicked in. Walked for over 2 hours and did 16,500 steps. Very sweaty. Even for a morning, it was sweltering. Cirrocumulus clouds starting to form.

1:14 PM–Just stepped outside. Have some cumulus clouds off to the northwest of GWC. Feels like a blast furnace. Inside it is comfortable since I activated the ceiling fan in my room. Feels much better. Temperature is 90 degrees. Dew point is 77. Heat index is 104.

7:13 PM–Driving home on Interstate 295 North, I can see a cumulonimbus cloud for a nearby storm.

8:25 PM–Now in South Plainfield, NJ, can see some flashes of lightning and cloud to cloud Lightning. Some rain fell.

10:39 PM–Checked today’s highs at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Temperature topped out at 95 degrees. Dew point peaked at 79. Heat index climbed to only 113. Total precipitation from the thunderstorm that came through was only 0.09 inches.



August 15, 2016

7:44 AM–Just stepped outside for a second. Lots of dew on the ground. Porch window fogged up a little. Temperature is at 74 degrees with a dew point of 74 for a heat index of 78. Barometer is rising at 30.11 inches of Hg. Had 0.01 inches of rain overnight. Rainfall for the month so far is just 0.65 inches. Rainfall for the year is at 21.95 inches.

9:32 AM–Just came in from going for a morning walk outside. Also did a mile run. Still very humid. Checked the conditions at the GWC WX Station. Temperature is at 80 degrees. Humidity is at 78 percent for a dew point of 73. Heat index is up to 85 degrees. Barometer is still rising at 30.12 inches of Hg.

12:05 PM–Did some work in the house. Checked conditions outside. Skies are sunny with some puffy cumulus clouds over head. Temperature at GWC is 86 degrees with humidity at 61 percent for a dew point of 71. Heat index is up to 92 degrees. Barometer is steady at 30.13 inches of Hg.

1:53 PM–Just returned from the store. Sun is very strong this afternoon. Temperature at GWC is now 89 degrees with a humidity of 57 percent for a dew point of 72. Heat index is up to 96 degrees. Barometer is steady at 30.12 inches. Showers and storms currently well to the west in Western Pennsylvania near Pittsburgh.

2:57 PM–For the fifth straight day, the temperature has reached at least 90 degrees at GWC in South Plainfield, NJ. Right now at the GWC WX Station, the temperature is at 91 degrees with the humidity at 51 percent for a dew point of 70. Heat index is up to 98 and the barometer remains steady at 30.12 inches of Hg. Skies remain sunny with puffy cumulus clouds about. Conditions are better than they were this weekend, but still fairly hot and humid.

8:32 PM–Checked the high temperature for today at GWC, and it was 91 degrees. Dew point peaked at 76. Heat index topped out at 100. Currently, the temperature is down to 80 degrees. Dew point is down to 73 degrees. Heat index is 85. Barometer remains steady at 30.12 inches of Hg.



August 16, 2016

7:07 PM–Woke up a little while ago. Took a peek outside. Sun has come up. Fog on the porch door windows. Temperature is 74 degrees. Humidity at 96 percent. Dew point at 73. Heat index is 78 degrees. Barometer is 30.14 inches of Hg and steady.

9:33 PM–Just came home after working out this morning. Did over 12,000 steps between a 4 mile walk and a 2.3 mile run. Very humid. Skies are sunny with plenty of cirrus and cirrocumulus clouds developing. Temperature is now up to 82 degrees with 77 percent humidity. Dew point is at 75. Heat index is up to 89. Barometer steady at 30.15 inches of Hg.

1:12 PM–Been taking occasional looks outside. Skies were overcast for a brief time this morning, but the sun eventually battled through it. Still have some cumulus clouds about. Temperature at GWC is now up to 86 degrees with the humidity at 71 percent for a dew point of 75 and a index that has gone back and forth a bit between 95 and 96 degrees. Barometer is falling at 30.10 inches of Hg.

3:21 PM–Just stepped outside. Getting close to cumulus congestus clouds. Warm and humid. Radar showing a really good line of storms in East Central Pennsylvania from north of Williamsport southward to near Gettysburg. Temperature right now is 89 degrees from a high of 91. Dew point is currently at the high for the day at 78. Heat index is down to 102 from a high of 106. Barometer is falling sharply at 30.03 inches of Hg.

5:38 PM–Checked radar earlier, and found that the line of storms are now in Eastern Pennsylvania from the Scranton-Wilkes Barre area to Reading. Temperature had risen to 90 degrees earlier, but is back down to 89. Dew point down to 77 degrees, but the heat index remains at 102. Barometer continues to fall sharply at 30.00 inches of Hg.

8:34 PM–Line of storms broke up, especially on the southern portion of the front as it approached New Jersey. Heard some rumbles of thunder. Skies grew dark especially around 7:30 PM, but there was no rain or severe weather at GWC. Temperature is down to 86 degrees. Humidity is at 77 percent for a dew point of 78 degrees. Heat index is down to 97 degrees. Barometer is still falling at 29.97 inches of Hg.



August 17, 2016

12:33 AM–Woke up to the sound of thunder. Checked radar. Strong line of storms coming through. National Weather Service Office in Mount Holly had issued a Special Weather Statement regarding the storms. Passed that along to my followers. Thunder is very loud. Some flashes of lightning.

5:20 AM–Getting ready to go to Washington Rock to catch a sunrise. Checked the temperature and heat index. Temperature was 74, but the heat index was 78. Still a lot of humidity outside.

7:45 AM–Returned from trips to Washington Rock and Spring Lake Park. Went for a walk in Spring Lake Park. Had quite a bit of fog at Washington Rock. Still quite humid. There is a little more of a breeze though. Feels more comfortable. Saw a large tree limb down over on Walnut Street in Piscataway. Also saw a similar tree limb down in South Plainfield.

9:15 AM–Returned from taking another trip to Spring Lake Park. Went back there to play some basketball, which I haven’t done in a while. Felt good, but it was very humid. Worked up a good sweat.

11:45 AM–Just finished a job interview here in the house. Temperature is up to 81 degrees with the heat index of 83. Dew point is at 68. So, things are a bit more comfortable. Could the heatwave be broken today?

12:33 PM–Did another check of the GWC WX Station here at the house. Looking much more comfortable today than it has been for the last week or so. Temperature is at 82 degrees with the humidity at 61 percent for a dew point of 67. Heat index is only at 84. Have a bit of a breeze going with winds between 10 and 15 miles per hour. Barometer is at 30.01 inches of Hg and steady. Had 0.53 inches of rain from the storms overnight.

6:39 PM–Returned from a busy afternoon with appointments and interviews. Very nice late summer afternoon. Nice breeze. Much more pleasant than it has been. Actually, the heatwave officially ended as the high at GWC was only 85 degrees. Dew point peaked earlier this morning at 77 degrees. Heat index topped out at 92. Rainfall rate from storms this morning was 8.35 inches per hour. Currently, the temperature is 83 degrees with the humidity at 62 degrees for a dew point of 68. Heat index is down to 87 degrees. Barometer is steady at 29.97 inches of Hg.

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