07.18.14

GWC Time Lapse–July 14, 2014–Thunderstorms Roll Through Raritan Center

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos, GWC Time Lapse at 1:55 pm by gmachos

Here is a time lapse video of weather conditions over the Raritan Center section of Edison, New Jersey on Monday, July 14, 2014. On this date, heavy rain developed over all of New Jersey, and brought over several inches of rain to many spots. At Greg’s Weather Center in South Plainfield, NJ, there was 1.14 inches of rain on this day. During the four day span of July 13-16, 2014, there was 2.38 inches of rain at GWC.

GWC Slideshow–July 13-15, 2014–Thunderstorms

Posted in GWC News, YouTube Videos, GWC Slideshows at 1:33 pm by gmachos

Here is a slideshow from photos taken of the severe weather that developed around Central Jersey during the period of July 13-15, 2014. Over this three day span, storms produced approximately 2.38 inches of rain. Combined with the heavy rains on July 2nd and 3rd, there has been approximately 6.41 inches of rain at GWC in South Plainfield so far in July 2014.

07.14.14

GWC Time Lapse–July 13, 2014–Cirrocumulus Clouds at Sunset

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos, GWC Time Lapse at 8:30 am by gmachos

Here is a time lapse video of cirrocumulus clouds as well as some cirrus drifting over South Amboy’s Waterfront Park in advance of thunderstorms that came through Central Jersey on the night of July 13, 2014. These storms brought 0.68 inches of rain to GWC in South Plainfield, NJ.

07.09.14

GWC Car Cam Footage–July 8, 2014–Driving Home during the Derecho

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos at 8:31 pm by gmachos

Here is car cam footage of a drive home that I took from Rahway High School through Colonia and North Edison during the derecho on July 8, 2014. While the storm system did bring some gusty winds, it had lost some punch by the time it reached Northern Middlesex County. It did have more of a bite further north in Westchester, Putnam, and Duchess counties in New York.

07.07.14

Back to the Broiler to Start the Work Week

Posted in GWC News at 3:17 am by gmachos

Heat and Humidity Return After Nice Weekend; Strong to Severe Storms Possible on Tuesday and Wednesday

They say that all good things must come to an end.  So it goes for the nice weather that the New York Metropolitan area including Central Jersey has enjoyed since Friday evening.  After two plus days of comfortable temperatures, plenty of sunshine, and low humidity that turned the holiday weekend from a near bummer to spectacular, the heat and humidity are set to return as we begin a new work week.

High pressure that was responsible for the amazing weather this holiday weekend will begin to migrate and moderate.  The ridge will then begin to produce a more southwesterly flow as our region gets on the back side of it.  As a result, warmer and more humid air will be ushered in from the south and Gulf of Mexico.  Our next storm system will be a cold front moving in from the west by the middle of the week, and will usher in the next round of nice weather for the latter portion of this weekend into the first half of next weekend.

Moisture started to creep in on Sunday afternoon in the form of cirrocumulus clouds following some high cirrus in the morning.  The National Weather Service office in Mount Holly, New Jersey has indicated in its forecast for Northwestern Middlesex County that temperatures will be in the low 90s for Monday and Tuesday before dropping into the upper 80s on Wednesday and the mid 80s by Thursday.  The NWS Hazardous Weather Outlook indicates that heat index values will rise into the 95 to 100 degree range for the Interstate 95 corridor over the next several days.

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma has issued a Convective Outlook for tomorrow that calls for a slight risk of severe weather for a good portion of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic including Upstate New York, much of Pennsylvania and West Virginia as well as Southeastern Ohio on Tuesday.  The NWS in Mount Holly indicates that there is a possibility of strong to severe storms on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings.  Storms could contain strong winds and hail as well as dump heavy rains.  The Weather Channel forecasts thunderstorms possible on Tuesday and Thursday.

07.06.14

Great Weather Takes Hold for Rest of Holiday Weekend

Posted in GWC News at 2:50 am by gmachos

High Pressure Moves In Bringing With It Pleasant Conditions For Region

After a stormy prelude to the a Fourth of July holiday weekend that included two days of severe thunderstorms and a day of dealing with Arthur, the rest of the weekend looks to be spectacular.  

Behind the cold front that brought us the severe weather on Wednesday and Thursday before clearing itself and Hurricane Arthur out to sea on Friday, is high pressure bringing with it cooler and drier air.

Following an early to mid-week period that featured temperatures in the upper 80s to mid 90s, dew points in the upper 70s, and heat indices ranging from 100 to 110, conditions felt almost fall like when the skies cleared on Friday night just in time for fireworks displays all around the region.  

The nice weather is going up several notches on Saturday and Sunday with sunny skies along with a puffy cumulus cloud here and there.  Temperatures are forecast to be in the low to mid 80s with comfortable dew points, and a nice refreshing breeze.

Conditions couldn’t be any better for a trip to the Jersey Shore, a picnic or barbecue, seeing a baseball game like the one being played between the Mets and the Texas Rangers at Citi Field, or perhaps for viewing additional fireworks.  

There is a bit of a problem along the Jersey Shore with heavy surf and dangerous rip currents.  Arthur is now a non-tropical system heading for the Canadian Maritimes, but still is stirring up the ocean.  So, you may want to stay out of the water this weekend.

07.05.14

The Birthday Hurricane

Posted in Storm History, GWC News, Tracking the Tropics, Model Forecasts at 2:05 pm by gmachos

Arthur Brings Unwanted Present For 4th of July Holiday and Birthday

With the fast start in the Eastern Pacific, and nothing happening for much of the first month of the season in the Atlantic, many wondered if the El Niño was kicking in as predicted it would this summer.  Ending the month of June, the EPAC already had 5 named storms in the books including two major hurricanes while the Atlantic was just to even have a tropical depression.  Everything changed earlier this week when a disturbance off the Southeastern United States, began to become more organized and eventually became Tropical Depression One.

The disturbance began getting attention over the previous weekend that ended the month of June.  Forecasts were already hinting at rough weather come the middle to end of the holiday week.  There was already a couple storm systems moving through the country that brought severe weather to the Plains, and even a derecho like MCS on Monday into Tuesday.  Heat and humidity was already building up in the Eastern half of the country with 90 plus degree temperatures in New Jersey on Tuesday and Wednesday with heat index values shooting well over 100 degrees thanks to a dew point that was just under 80 degrees.

A cold front began approaching from the Midwest on Wednesday, and it brought severe weather to Eastern Pennsylvania and much of New Jersey.  Storms produced gusty winds, several rounds of heavy rain, and dangerous lightning.  GWC was out in the storms on Wednesday.  There was a lot of ponding of roads and some flash flooding around South Plainfield.  Approximately 2.17 inches fell on Wednesday followed by 1.82 on Thursday for just under 4 inches of rain in just 27 hours.  The front would be a saving grace though.   Although it combined with Arthur to produce to heavy rains along the Jersey Shore and jeopardize Fourth of July celebrations in Long Branch and Point Pleasant, the front prevented Arthur from going over the Garden State like Irene and Sandy did two to three years ago.

The forecast models were having a field day with Arthur.  First the 12z HWRF run earlier this week showed Arthur becoming a very strong hurricane with a well defined eye moving over the Outer Banks of North Carolina on Independence Day.  Then the Euro model followed suit.  Arthur eventually became the Atlantic season’s first hurricane on Thursday, July 3rd, and didn’t stop there.  The storm system continued to feed off of the warm, moist air rising from the Gulf Stream, and intensified further into a Category Two Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale with 100 mph winds, and a minimum central pressure of 976 millibars, or 28.82 inches of Hg (Mercury) at 9:00 PM on the third.  Within two and a half hours, Arthur made landfall over Cape Lookout, North Carolina.

The storm forced mandatory evacuations along many of North Carolina’s barrier islands including Hatteras Island.  Much of Route 12, the only way in and out of the Outer Banks, and which suffered significant damage from Hurricane Irene in 2011, did receive some minor damage.  However, by morning, the southeastern beaches in North Carolina such as Wrightsville Beach and Wilmington had sunshine while further north in Cape Hatteras, the skies were still cloudy, but the brunt of the weather from Arthur had moved on.  According to state officials in North Carolina, Route 12 was back in business by Saturday morning (July 5th).  Arthur still emerged from the Tar Heel State as a Category Two Hurricane, but gradually began to weaken as it moved into more cooler waters off the Jersey Shore and Delaware coast.  Feeder bands from the storm combined with the cold front that had pushed through much of New Jersey on Thursday to bring heavy rains to those coastal areas.

Although staying well offshore in the Mid-Atlantic, Arthur came up the East Coast to bring tropical storm conditions to Cape Cod, Nantucket, and Martha’s Vineyard before going into Eastern Maine and the Canadian Maritimes before losing its tropical characteristics.  The storm wound up being an unwanted guest at GWC, which was not only celebrating the holiday, but also the birthday of its president, Greg Machos.  Things did clear out in time for the Fourth of July Fireworks in Jersey City, New York City, and Long Branch.  Nice weather is expected for the rest of the weekend as high pressure pushed in to bring in clear skies, less humidity, breezy conditions, and cooler temperatures.

07.04.14

GWC Storm Footage–July 3, 2014–Thunderstorms Strike Again

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos at 5:05 pm by gmachos

Here is video footage of a thunderstorm that came through GWC in South Plainfield, New Jersey on July 3, 2014. On this date, a cold front continued to push eastward and brought severe weather to Eastern Pennsylvania and much of New Jersey. Storms produced gusty winds, heavy rain, and dangerous lightning. After receiving approximately 2.17 inches on July 2nd, this round of storms tallied another 1.82 inches in town.

GWC Time Lapse–July 3, 2014–Thunderstorms Bring Another Downpour

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos, GWC Web Cam, GWC Time Lapse at 4:45 pm by gmachos

Here is a time lapse video of a thunderstorm that came through GWC in South Plainfield, New Jersey on July 3, 2014. On this date, a cold front continued to push eastward and brought severe weather to Eastern Pennsylvania and much of New Jersey. Storms produced gusty winds, heavy rain, and dangerous lightning. After receiving approximately 2.17 inches on July 2nd, this round of storms tallied another 1.82 inches in town.

07.03.14

GWC Storm Footage–July 2, 2014–Severe Thunderstorms

Posted in GWC News, Storm Footage, YouTube Videos at 7:55 pm by gmachos

Here is video footage of a series of thunderstorms that came through the Putnam Park area of South Plainfield, New Jersey on July 2, 2014. On this date, a cold front began approaching from the Midwest, and brought severe weather to Eastern Pennsylvania and much of New Jersey. Storms produced gusty winds, several rounds of heavy rain, and dangerous lightning. GWC was out in the storms on Wednesday when approximately 2.17 inches fell and caused a lot of ponding of roads and some flash flooding around South Plainfield.

« Previous entries · Next entries »